The Big "C"

Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma and Lymphedema, Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and Lymphedema, Hodgkins Lymphoma, Kidney and Renal Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Breast Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Testicular, arm swelling, Skin Cancer, angiosarcoma, kaposi's sarcoma, gallium scan, axillary node dissection, gynecological cancer, axillary reverse mapping, lymphatic cancers, inguinal node dissection, cancer treatment, Complete decongestive therapy for arm lymphedema, lymphedema therapy, intensive decongestive physiotherapy, breast cancer related lymphedema, upper limb lymphedema

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The Big "C"

Postby patoco » Mon Jul 10, 2006 1:03 pm

The Big "C"

Lymphedema People

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com

.............

The harsh realities of cancer, even in a golf magazine, simply cannot be ignored

Golf Digest

August 2006

Five hundred and sixty-four thousand, eight-hundred and thirty Americans will die from cancer this year. It's responsible for about one-fifth of all deaths in the developed world.

Cancer is the common name for a variety of diseases that occur when a few of your cells, which divide and grow all the time, inexplicably go into massive overdrive. It can strike anyone, anywhere, at any age (though the risk rises as you get older). Among the deadliest is lung cancer, which will kill 162,460 Americans this year.

If you smoke, stop. Today. Use sunscreen. Get your body and its immune system in top shape by eating well, sleeping well and staying fit. Early detection is crucial, so make friends with your doc. Above all, keep a positive outlook on life, which, by the way, is meant for living. And playing golf.

Breast Cancer

THE NUMBERS
• The most common cancer in women (besides skin cancers), with about 210,000 cases diagnosed each year. Kills 40,000 American women a year. Seventy-seven percent diagnosed are 50 or older. Early detection and better treatments have improved survival rates.

WHO'S AT RISK?
• Women who have a mother, sister or daughter who have the disease; began menstruating at 12 or younger; started menopause at 55 or older; never had pregnancy to term; used hormone therapy for long periods; or were exposed to high-dose radiation to the chest.

HOW TO DETECT
• Monthly self-examination, annual mammograms, clinical exams. Most common symptom: a painless mass in the breast.

TREATMENT OPTIONS
• Radiation, chemotherapy, bone-marrow transplant, ovarian ablation. Surgery ranging from lumpectomy to total mastectomy; often includes removal of lymph nodes, which in some patients can lead to post-surgery lymphedema with painful swelling of the hands and arms.

HOW TO HELP THE CAUSE
• Golf For Women magazine supports Rally For A Cure. Since 1996, more than a million golfers have participated, raising more than $22 million for the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. For details, phone 800-327-6811 or visit rallyforacure.com.

Prostate Cancer

THE NUMBERS
• The disease kills about 28,000 Americans every year. It's the most common cancer in men (besides skin cancers), with 220,000 men diagnosed annually.

• Because approximately 90 percent of all prostate cancers are detected in early stages, which is essential, the cure rate is very high. Nearly 100 percent of men diagnosed in the local or regional stage will be disease-free after five years.

WHO'S AT RISK?
• Men with a family history of the disease, those with high-fat diets, African-Americans (twice the risk as white Americans).

SYMPTOMS
• If the cancer is caught at its earliest stages, most men will not experience any symptoms. Some men, however, will experience symptoms such as frequent, hesitant or burning urination, difficulty in having an erection, or pain or stiffness in the lower back, hips or upper thighs.

WHAT TO DO
• Screening for prostate cancer can be performed in a physician’s office using two tests: the PSA (prostate-specific antigen) blood test and the digital-rectal exam (DRE). These are essential once a year for men beginning at age 50.

TREATMENT OPTIONS
• Options include surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy and chemotherapy, any or all of which might be used. It's best to see all three types of prostate cancer specialists--urologist, radiation oncologist and medical oncologist--to fully comprehend all available treatments.

HOW TO HELP THE CAUSE
• Join Arnie's Army Battles Prostate Cancer, which sets up one-day, one-hole, closest-to-the-pin contests, with proceeds going to the Prostate Cancer Foundation. The Golf Digest Celebrity Invitational also raises funds for the foundation. For details, visit arniesarmybattles.com.

One in five Americans will get skin cancer, and white males over 50 are the most susceptible to the disease. Knowing how to check for non-melanoma (basal cell and squamous cell) and melanoma, the deadly form of skin cancer, can save your life, says Dr. Michael Kaminer, a dermatologist and skin cancer surgeon. The chart below will help you do a self check. If you spot an unusual blemish, see a dermatologist immediately. Every golfer should see a skin doctor annually. After removal of a mole, golfers can be back playing in a week, Kaminer says.

Golf Digest - GOogle Health News

http://www.golfdigest.com/health/index. ... 8bigc.html
patoco
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The Big "C" and the Big "L" - My Opinion

Postby patoco » Mon Jul 10, 2006 1:15 pm

The statistics on cancer survivors acquiring secondary lymphedema are frightening as well.

It is now documented that between 30 - 40% of breast cancer survivors will devlop secondary lymphedema at some point in their life.

We are now seeing figures coming out for prostate cancer as well and they are running the same. Between 30 - 40 % of prostate cancer survivors will see leg lymphedema develop.

With cancer treatments improving dramatically and cancer patients now living decades beyond what was formerly expected isn't it about time that oncology comes to grip with lymphedema?

How many millions of cancer survivors are going to come down with lymphedema before the medical community awakens to this condition.

Most cancer survivors have never been warned much less have never heard of lymphedema.

In Georgia one organization wanted to put brochures in the offices of the states largest network of cancer treatment centers - and was soundly stopped by the doctor in charge.

He "didn't want to scare the patients."

A big shame on the medical community :x
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Cancer and Lymphedema

Postby PamelaS » Tue Jul 11, 2006 11:56 am

Pat,

I guess I was one of the "lucky ones". My radiation oncologist had already informed me of the possibility of lymphedema and would check my arm every time she saw me. Additionally there was a certified PT for lymph. in the same hospital, who I was eventually referred to and treated by.

On the other hand, not knowing what lymph. was before then, it took several friends at work pointing out that my arm was slightly swollen before I began realizing that there was a problem. There was also some heaviness, which is also something that happens. I also noticed that the veining on the underside of the arm was no longer visible.

You would think that oncologists would have the sense to let us know that this is a potential problem down the road. You start removing lymph nodes and something may happen - SURPRISE - NOT!

Thank you for being here for us - I've learned alot while being here and am thankful for the information.

Pamela
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Postby patoco » Tue Jul 11, 2006 11:51 pm

Hi Pamela :)

Yet, once I had an oncologist who flat said, "I don't know anything about lymphedema and don't need to." That was the last time I went to him.

Couple years down the road, I was at a lymphedema meeting close to one of his offices and oveheard two breast cancer patients talking this horrible doctor and how rude he was to them.

I ask them what his name was...yep....same guy.

To top it off, this jerk is a former professor at a prestigious medical school here in the Atlanta area.

Absolutely amazing......

Pat
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Postby joanne johnson » Wed Jul 12, 2006 4:01 pm

Sometimes it seems the dumber you are the higher your salary. Personally, I rather have a brain and some self respect. Big bucks don't mean everything!
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The Big "C" and my Outrage

Postby PamelaS » Thu Jul 13, 2006 5:41 am

I must tell you what continues to amaze and outrage me. These MDs (oncologists) know that lymph. is a potential complication of cancer surgery. Do you think that my CA surgeon or medical oncologist ever ONCE mentioned this to me - NO. It was only the radiation oncologist.

In fact it took a friend at work to point out to me she noticed swelling in my arm. Only then did anyone listen to me and a series of tests and whella, I've got a problem here - well no joke people!

They also never bothered telling me I could get scarring on my lungs from the radiation (because of the proximity of the breasts to lungs). I will now live with Pulmonary Fibrosis for the rest of my life; besides the astma I aleady had/have. The medical community does not even know how to treat it the Pulmonary Fibrosis.

Sorry for the rant - but this gets to me!

Pamela
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