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glossary:triglycerides

The major form of fat. A triglyceride consists of three molecules of fatty acid combined with a molecule of the alcohol glycerol. Triglycerides serve as the backbone of many types of lipids (fats). Triglycerides come from the food we eat as well as from being produced by the body.

Triglyceride levels are influenced by recent fat and alcohol intake, and should be measured after fasting for at least 12 hours. A period of abstinence from alcohol is advised before testing for triglycerides.

Triglyceride levels do not provide clinically significant data about the risk of coronary artery disease beyond the information provided by serum cholesterol subfractions (HDL- and LDL-cholesterol).

Markedly high triglyceride levels (greater than 500mg/dl) can cause inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). Therefore, these high levels should be treated aggressively with low fat diets and medications, if needed.

The word “triglyceride” reflects the fact that a triglyceride consists of three (“tri-”) molecules of fatty acid combined with a molecule of the alcohol glycerol (”-glyceride”) that serves as the backbone in many types of lipids (fats).

Common Misspellings: tryglicerides, triglyerides, triglyserides

glossary/triglycerides.txt · Last modified: 2012/10/16 14:40 (external edit)